Liz Wolfe | how to ask for what you want
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Last month I went to a stimulating business conference in Orlando. Surprisingly, the most memorable learning experience for me came out of a nature walk I took on the hotel grounds. I discovered the hotel had a nature trail on its extensive grounds when I first arrived. Getting to the path seemed straightforward enough on the hotel’s map, so I decided to walk it the next morning as a way to start my day. I imagined that I would get fresh air and exercise while enjoying nature and becoming grounded. With this clear vision in mind, I ventured out into the chilly Florida morning.

I woke up yesterday angry at America. Angry at the world! And angry at my kids. Someone ate the Reese’s peanut butter cup right off my dresser, the one that I’d been saving, the one, truth be told, I took without asking right out of my son’s Halloween candy stash. Found the wrappers in the trash can, right within view, no hiding that. When confronted, neither my son nor daughter admitted to having eaten it. Could my husband, who is out of town, have eaten it? Nope, he texts me. Back to the kids. My son did his “I’m lying but pretending not to be” shrug, twice, and I shrugged it right back at him. He also claimed to have completed all his homework on Election Day – back to that in a minute – on his day off. Nope. Lying again. I looked straight at him and said, “I don’t understand why saying you didn’t eat a candy bar that I know you ate is worth defending.” At no point, however, did I admit that I had taken it right from the stash strewn over his floor. So that technically it was his. I was waiting for him to admit it first. Which being 13 he was not likely to do.

Usually a New Year inspires us to make resolutions and usually those resolutions include actions we're going to take to get us more of what we want in life. However, this year, I decided I'm going to declare 2012 as the year of "letting go." Instead of working towards some goal, I'm going figuratively lean back, open my arms and let go of... Worrying about things that are outside my circle of control. The need to control. Self-doubt and the need for approval.

Welcome to the practice of the principles of Abundance and Prosperity! I began my own abundance and prosperity journey 23 years ago when I arrived in NYC fresh faced from college, with high aspirations and not a clue as to how to achieve them. I was born in a city but raised by Wolves on a sheep farm in western PA. We moved to the farm when I was 6 years old, and, after my parents divorced, my mother, my two sisters and I ran the farm. We supported ourselves by creating products from the available resources – selling lamb meat, spinning wool, creating sheepskin coats and many other diverse items. It was not a financially successful endeavor; by the time that I was an adult, my mother had declared bankruptcy and sold the farm. On the other hand I had learned entrepreneurial skills as a method of survival, and was able to see how money could be created from our skills and efforts.